Single Leg Balance for Core Stability

This dynamic exercise improves your balance, strengthens your glutes, mobilises your hips, and activates the intrinsic muscles in your feet. Although it seems to be called “Running Man’ balance on Google, it’s a great stabiliser for both runners and cyclists, and I highly recommend you include it in your core training routine.

The key muscles worked are your hip flexors, glutes, abdominal core, lower leg and foot stabilisers.

There are 2 ways to do this balance: either as a dynamic moving sequence, or as a static hold. Both are effective, but personally I prefer the static hold variation as I can feel the functional engagement of my entire lower body responding to the balance – intensified with my eyes closed!

Make sure that you do this in bare feet, as it’s the only way to initiate the neuromuscular response from your feet upwards (if you wear shoes they will provide extra stability and lessen the effectiveness of this movement).

Dynamic Single Leg Balance – Method:

  1. Stand upright, lift your left leg by bending your knee high and stand balancing on your right leg.
  2. Bend your arms in a typical running position with your left arm bent in front of your torso and right arm bent behind.
  3. On an exhale bend your right knee and take your left leg out behind you, while leaning forward and swinging your right arm forward and left arm back.
  4. On an inhale lift back to the starting position. Repeat 10-15 times.
  5. Switch to the opposite side. Repeat.

Static Single Leg Balance – Method:

  1. Come into step 3 above and hold for 10 to 20 full breaths (30 to 60 seconds).
  2. Switch to the opposite side. Repeat.

Advanced Method:

Increase the level of difficulty by doing this movement with your eyes closed, or alternatively balancing on a wobble board or cushion.

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